Tag CollegeBoard

AP Scores and College Credit

AP Scores cropped

Although this year AP tests were “non-traditional”, many colleges have said that they will still award AP credit (see this list by Prompt).  AP scores will be available online beginning July 15.  Scores are released over several days based on the state in which you tested.  View the date and location schedule, and your scores, on the College Board website.  

What is the AP exam score scale? 

There is no “pass” or “fail” on the AP tests.  It’s important to understand the definitions of the AP scores. 

5 = extremely well qualified | Many universities award college credit  

4 = well qualified | Some universities award college credit 

3 = qualified | Some universities award college credit 

2 = possibly qualified | No college credit awarded 

1 = no recommendation | No college credit awarded 

Send Your Scores to Your College 

Be sure you send your scores to the college you are attending in the fall.  The college needs your official AP scores to award you any college credit.  Additionally, your college may use these scores for placement purposes.  Even if you do not receive credit, it’s important to send your official score report.  Check with your college to confirm their policy on awarding AP credit.  You can also find those policies on the AP Credit Policy Search site.  You may also hear this information from your advisor at orientation, or see your college credits on your school’s student web portal.      

What if I have other scores? 

Go to www.apscore.org to view scores on tests you took in previous years. 

I have other questions about AP scores.

You can contact the CollegeBoard directly for AP questions by emailing apstudents@info.collegeboard.org. 

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Refocus

People around the world are adapting to a new normal.  Businesses are reinventing themselves, restaurants are offering delivery and takeout options, television news and late-night shows are broadcasting from home, and colleges and schools across the US have adopted online learning formats.  Now that you may be settling in to a different routine, it’s time to refocus your efforts and adopt some new strategies regarding college admission.   

Keep Your Grades Up 

Many colleges have announced that they will waive the SAT/ACT requirements for Fall 2021 applications.  Some are also discussing how to view junior year grades given the abrupt change to online learning and some schools adopting pass/fail grading.  Although it’s impossible to predict how every college will review their applications, maintaining a high GPA is the best advice.  Check in with your teachers, ask for help, focus on doing your best with what’s asked of you. Having consistently strong grades or even an upward trend can only benefit you in the application process.  

Study for AP Exams 

The CollegeBoard announced that both the May and June SAT dates have been canceled.  This means you can stop thinking about the SAT for now.  Instead, focus your efforts on studying for any AP exams you may have.  AP exams will be given online meaning that you may want to prepare for the test a bit differently.  CollegeBoard has a list of helpful tips in preparing for an online, open book/open notes exam format.  Acing your AP exams is another way to show colleges your academic chops and potentially earn college credit saving yourself money and time in the future.           

Consider Virtual Volunteering or other Self-driven Extracurriculars 

With most school extracurriculars canceled, it’s time to rethink your activity list.  There are countless creative ways to demonstrate your skills or interests to a college.  Jodi Glou, founder and president of Custom College Consulting, compiled a great list of virtual volunteering opportunities.  Virtual volunteering is a great alternative to canceled summer plans and also an opportunity to use your skills to benefit organizations that may no longer have the in-person staff or funding to accomplish their mission.   

Take Action 

Don’t stress!  Andrew Palumbo, dean of admissions and financial aid at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass, wrote an open letter to high school juniors this week.  While he admits that there is a lot to worry about right now, he says grades and SAT scores shouldn’t be on that list.  His message to students: “We’ll figure it out together.”     

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COVID Admissions

The ripple effects of COVID-19 are just starting to make their impacts.  It’s safe to say that the coronavirus has upended the college admission process for the coming year.  You probably have a lot of questions and colleges are just starting to make adjustments to their admission process for next year.  Here are some of the topics that students and colleges are grappling with:  

I was going to take the May SAT but it is canceled.  

CollegeBoard and ACT have been monitoring the pandemic in an attempt to provide students with options.  Currently the June 6 SAT is still scheduled.  ACT has tests scheduled for June 13 (rescheduled from April) and July 18.  However, it’s true that you may only have one opportunity to take the test.  As a result, many colleges have announced they are going to be test optional (at least for the 2020-2021 application year).  FairTest has a list of test optional schools and schools that will be temporarily test optional.   

All of my activities are canceled for spring – what should I put on my activity list?  

Colleges understand – no sports, no spring performances, no student council or volunteer hours.  Your activity list may look a bit different than what you had planned.  Maybe it will include all the books you read while staying at home, a new language you taught yourself on Duolingo, or the tech support you offered your grandmother so you could all keep in touch.  If necessity is the mother of invention, maybe boredom is the mother of creativity.  Time to get creative.        

We are doing online learning – they say our grades will be pass/fail.   

Colleges are going to be making a lot of adjustments to the way they consider applications.  Don’t panic about your grades not looking like they normally would.  High schools across the country are doing their best in this unprecedented situation.  Many colleges are doing the same for their own students – offering them the option to have pass/fail grades.  They will be understanding of whatever your school decided for grading.   

I think COVID-19 will make a great essay topic.  

It’s possible that the pandemic has changed your school/life experience in dramatic ways.  It would be natural to think this would make a perfect college essay.  But don’t forget, many students are sharing this same experience. You want your college essay to stand out, attract attention, or be remembered by the admission staff.  Consider whether your experience or perspective is unique.  You don’t want to be just another coronavirus essay…    

What about college visits?  

Many juniors were planning college tours for spring break and those in person tours were likely canceled.  However, there are still plenty of opportunities to get to know a college.  Take an online tour, attend a virtual admission events, chat with student tour guides, follow a school on Instagram and comment on a post.  Not only does this help you gather information, but colleges also track these online connections as part of “demonstrated interest.”  Some colleges consider demonstrated interest in the admission process.  Hopefully, in person visits will resume in the fall.     

Take Action 

The best advice as always is to stay informed.  Visit the websites for the colleges you are considering to find updates on admission policies and requirements and be in touch with your advisor about changes to your upcoming applications.  NACAC is providing this online resource to students and families as a centralized place where you can check for updates on all your schools.   

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School from home

Online classes or some modified version of schooling at home is the new reality for a large majority of students in the country.  The coronavirus pandemic has created huge education adjustment for everyone involved – students, parents, and teachers.  Many are now worried – especially juniors – about how this new version of school will impact your college admission prospects next year.   

Before you get ahead of yourself, start by thinking of how can you stay focused and productive today.  It’s important to maintain your junior year grades and to finish the year with strong learning gains.  Use these school-from-home tips to make the most of your time.     

  1. Maintain your morning routine – GET UP!  Sure, it’s tempting to sleep until noon but you’ll be far better off if you stick with a schedule similar to what you had in school.  Get up at the same time, get showered and dressed as you normally would, grab your breakfast and get started.   
  2. Create a work space – Very little productivity comes from sitting on the couch or lying in bed.  You need to find a work space to call your own – especially if your parents and siblings are home too.  Maybe it’s in your room, or at the dining table, or even in a closet.  Find a space where you can sit upright in a comfortable chair, preferably the same space each day, and as free from distractions as possible.    
  3. Schedule breaks – Well, maybe it’s not recess but schedule breaks in your day to have a snack, go for a lap around your house, or just zone out.  Just like time between classes, it’s important to take scheduled breaks throughout the day.  Decide what works for you – work 45 minutes, take a 15 min break; or work for 1 hour, take a 30 min break.  Also set a time for lunch.     
  4. Have a stopping time – Stop your school work at the same time each day, just like you were in school.   
  5. Take care of yourself – These are ever changing and stressful circumstances which can take a toll on anyone.  Practice small strategies for physical and mental health each day that will help you ward off cabin fever.  Get outside for a walk or other exercise (everyday if possible), stay connected with friends online, and plan to do something you enjoy each day.  Play a video game, cook a favorite food, or watch a new show.  It’s nice to have something to look forward to after a day of work.    

Take Action 

You obviously didn’t choose this situation and it is understandably will take some getting used to.  The goal here isn’t perfection, and some days will be easier than others.  But maintaining a routine, staying in touch with teachers and classmates, and completing some school work each day will help you fight boredom and stay on track for when school resumes.

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Testing Updates

As a senior, it’s unlikely that you were planning to take the SAT or the ACT but coronavirus cancelations may still impact your spring test schedule.  You may have AP or IB exams, or possibly SAT Subject tests on your calendar however, testing organizations are working swiftly to reschedule or revise most of these exams.  With updates coming in on a rolling basis from testing organizations and colleges, it’s important to stay informed.  Check your email regularly, create a system for organizing important information, and stay in touch with your counselor.    

SAT Updates  

  • The May 2, 2020 SAT and SAT Subject Test administration has been canceled.   
  • The June 6, 2020 SAT and SAT Subject Test administration is still scheduled.  However, CollegeBoard will continue to assess health and safety recommendations and provide updates to registered students as soon as possible in case of changes.   
  • Refunds will be issued to students who are registered for canceled test dates.  
  • College Board will provide future additional SAT testing opportunities for students as soon as possible in place of canceled administrations. 

AP Exam Updates 

  • Traditional face-to-face exam administrations will not take place. Students will take a 45-minute online free-response exam at home.  
  • Some students may want to take the exam sooner rather than later, while the content is still fresh. Other students may want more time to practice. For each AP subject, there will be 2 different testing dates. 
  • The full exam schedule, specific free-response question types that will be on each AP Exam, and additional testing details will be available by April 3. We’ll also unlock any relevant free-response questions in AP Classroom for digital use so students can access all practice questions of the type that will appear on the exam. 

IB Exam Updates 

  • The May 2020 examinations scheduled between April 30 and May 22 for Diploma Programme and Career-related Programme candidates have been canceled and will not be rescheduled. 
  • Depending on what they registered for, students will be awarded a Diploma or a Course Certificate which reflects their standard of work. This is based on student’s coursework and the established assessment expertise, rigor and quality control already built into the programmes. 

ACT Updates 

  • ACT has rescheduled its April 4 national test date to June 13 across the U.S.  All students registered for the April 4 test date will receive an email from ACT in the next few days informing them of the postponement and instructions for free rescheduling to June 13 or a future national test date. 

Special Note for Seniors 

The coronavirus pandemic has been hard on students everywhere but it can feel especially egregious for seniors.  This was your year!  Suddenly things like senior trips, senior prom, graduation, the “last time I get to…” are being snatched away.  We are heartbroken with you that your high school experience is ending this way.  

But this is still your year and there’s a lot of it left!  Communities around the world have come together in the midst of unprecedented circumstances.  You – Generation Z, more than any generation – have the tools, ability, and creativity to make something extraordinary out of these strange circumstances.  We hear you and we feel your hurt – but we are also excited to see you soar!  You were made for this!     

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Testing Updates

Coronavirus cancelations seem to be coming in from all directions – schools, weddings, concerts, even the Olympics have either been canceled or rescheduled.  The SAT and ACT are no exception.  It’s likely that your spring test schedule (along with your other schedules) looks very different now than it did a week ago.  With updates coming in on a rolling basis from testing organizations and colleges, it’s important to stay informed.  Check your email regularly, create a system for organizing important information, and stay in touch with your counselor.     

SAT Updates  

  • The May 2, 2020 SAT and SAT Subject Test administration has been canceled.  
  • The June 6, 2020 SAT and SAT Subject Test administration is still scheduled.  However, CollegeBoard will continue to assess health and safety recommendations and provide updates to registered students as soon as possible in case of changes.   
  • Refunds will be issued to students who are registered for canceled test dates. 
  • College Board will provide future additional SAT testing opportunities for students as soon as possible in place of canceled administrations.

ACT Updates 

  • ACT has rescheduled its April 4 national test date to June 13 across the U.S.  All students registered for the April 4 test date will receive an email from ACT in the next few days informing them of the postponement and instructions for free rescheduling to June 13 or a future national test date. 

AP Exam Updates 

  • Traditional face-to-face exam administrations will not take place. Students will take a 45-minute online free-response exam at home.  
  • Some students may want to take the exam sooner rather than later, while the content is still fresh. Other students may want more time to practice. For each AP subject, there will be 2 different testing dates. 
  • The full exam schedule, specific free-response question types that will be on each AP Exam, and additional testing details will be available by April 3. We’ll also unlock any relevant free-response questions in AP Classroom for digital use so students can access all practice questions of the type that will appear on the exam. 

IB Exam Updates 

  • The May 2020 examinations scheduled between April 30 and May 22 for Diploma Programme and Career-related Programme candidates have been canceled and will not be rescheduled. 
  • Depending on what they registered for, students will be awarded a Diploma or a Course Certificate which reflects their standard of work. This is based on student’s coursework and the established assessment expertise, rigor and quality control already built into the programmes. 

Take Action 

The good news is you will have time to take the SAT or ACT before college deadlines.  We may also see more colleges becoming test optional as a result of this spring.  The full impact of these cancelations and other changes on college admission won’t be known for some time.  Meanwhile, stay healthy and stay safe and stay connected (virtually) with your school and friends.  You – Generation Z, more than any generation – have the tools, ability, and creativity to make something extraordinary out of these strange circumstances. 

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